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ABT 2008 City Center seasonTo Honor Antony Tudor


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#1 Dale

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Posted 07 April 2008 - 04:07 PM

From the company:

AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE TO HONOR ANTONY TUDOR WITH CENTENNIAL TRIBUTE AT NEW YORK CITY CENTER, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2008, 8 P.M.

Annual Fall Season, October 21-November 2, to be Highlighted by
Revival Premiere of Tudor’s Jardin aux Lilas and
Company Premieres of Paul Taylor’s Company B
and Jiří Kylián’s Overgrown Path


In honor of the centennial of Antony Tudor, one of the masters of twentieth-century dance, American Ballet Theatre will dedicate an evening of works in tribute to the choreographer’s genius on Friday, October 31, 2008 at New York City Center. This dedicated evening is part of ABT’s annual Fall season at City Center, October 21-November 2, which will also celebrate the late choreographer with works performed on each program throughout the two-week engagement. ABT’s Tudor Centennial Tribute and its 2008 City Center season was announced today by Artistic Director Kevin McKenzie.

American Ballet Theatre’s Tudor Centennial Tribute, including special guest appearances and film excerpts depicting Tudor at work, will complement performances of several of the choreographer's greatest works, many originally created for ABT. The evening will begin with a performance of Continuo (1971) and will be highlighted by Jardin aux Lilas (1936) and pas de deux from Romeo and Juliet (1943) and The Leaves Are Fading (1975). Performances of Judgment of Paris (1938) and Pillar of Fire (1942) will complete the tribute evening. ABT’s Tudor Centennial Tribute is made possible by a generous grant from The Howard Gilman Foundation and Gilman Paper Company.

ANTONY TUDOR, 1908-1987

Antony Tudor, one of the giants of twentieth century choreography, began dancing professionally with Ballet Rambert in London. All of his early ballets ‑‑ Cross‑garter'd (1931), Lysistrata (1932) and The Planets (1934) ‑‑ were created for that company.

In 1939, Tudor was invited by Ballet Theatre to join its first season and to restage three of the works he was known for in London ‑‑ Jardin aux Lilas, Dark Elegies, and Judgment of Paris. Since that time, he has been represented in every American Ballet Theatre season. Gala Performance was added to the repertory in 194l, Pillar of Fire in 1942, Romeo and Juliet and Dim Lustre in 1943, Undertow in 1945, Shadow of the Wind in 1948, Nimbus in 1950, The Leaves Are Fading and Shadowplay in 1975, The Tiller in the Fields in 1978, Little Improvisations in 1980 and Fandango in 1988.

Tudor performed in many of his own ballets as well as in works of other choreographers. In 1950, Tudor gave up performing to become head of faculty of the Metropolitan Opera Ballet School. He choreographed Offenbach in the Underworld in 1955 and set it for American Ballet Theatre the following year. In 1963, he choreographed Echoing of Trumpets for the Royal Swedish Ballet; it was staged for American Ballet Theatre in 1967.

In May 1986, Tudor was presented with the Handel Medallion, New York City's highest cultural honor. In December of the same year, he was the recipient of a Kennedy Center Honor.

In 1951, Tudor joined the Juilliard School’s Dance Division as a founding faculty member; a position be held until 1971. He was appointed Associate Director of ABT in 1975 in which capacity he served until his appointment as Choreographer Emeritus in 1980. He continued in this position until his death in 1987.



Opening Night

American Ballet Theatre's Opening Night Gala on Tuesday evening, October 21 at 6:30pm will celebrate Antony Tudor with the pas de deux from his 1943 production of the one act Romeo and Juliet. The full production, last performed by ABT in 1976, is set to music by Frederick Delius, arranged by Antal Dorati, with scenery and costumes by Eugene Berman. Tudor’s Romeo and Juliet, created for Ballet Theatre, was given its World Premiere at the Metropolitan Opera House on April 6, 1943.



COMPANY PREMIERES

American Ballet Theatre’s 2008 season at New York City Center will feature the Company Premiere of Paul Taylor’s Company B on Opening Night, Tuesday, October 21. Set to songs by the Andrews Sisters with costumes by Santo Loquasto and lighting by Jennifer Tipton, Company B received its World Premiere in 1991 by the Paul Taylor Dance Company. Staged for ABT by Patrick Corbin, the ballet will receive seven performances during the Company’s two-week City Center season.

Jiří Kylián’s Overgrown Path, set to music by Leoš Janáček (On an Overgrown Path, 1902), will receive its American Ballet Theatre Premiere on Thursday evening, October 23. Created by Kylián as an homage to Antony Tudor, the ballet features sets and costumes by Walter Nobbe and lighting by Kees Tjebbes. Overgrown Path was given its World Premiere by the Netherlands Dance Theatre in 1980 at The Hague, The Netherlands. Overgrown Path, which will be given five performances this season, will be staged for ABT by Roslyn Anderson.



REVIVAL PREMIERES

Antony Tudor’s Jardin aux Lilas, last performed by ABT in 2001, will have its Revival Premiere on Wednesday evening, October 29. Created for Ballet Rambert in 1936, Jardin aux Lilas was first performed by Ballet Theatre during the Company’s inaugural season in 1940. With music by Ernest Chausson (Poeme), this production of Jardin aux Lilas features costumes by Ramond Sovey, after sketches by Hugh Stevenson, scenery by Zack Brown and lighting by Jennifer Tipton. The ballet explores human relationships with the use of gestures – quick glances, a suddenly outstretched arm, a gesture of sympathy – movements that have become Tudor’s hallmarks. Staged for ABT by Donald Mahler, Jardin aux Lilas will be given five performances by ABT.

Twyla Tharp’s Brief Fling, last performed by ABT in 1991, will receive its Revival Premiere on Tuesday evening, October 28 at 7:30pm. Set to music by Michel Colombier and Percy Grainger (Country Gardens and Handel in the Strand) with costumes by Isaac Mizrahi, Brief Fling received its World Premiere by ABT in San Francisco in 1990. A work for eighteen dancers, Brief Fling will have five performances during ABT’s City Center season.



RETURNING REPERTORY

Last season’s revival of Antony Tudor’s The Leaves Are Fading will highlight the returning repertory for American Ballet Theatre’s 2008 City Center season. Additional repertory scheduled for the season will include Tudor’s Pillar of Fire, Twyla Tharp’s Baker’s Dozen and George Balanchine’s Ballo della Regina and Theme and Variations,

The Leaves Are Fading will be given four performances this season beginning Wednesday evening, October 22. Created for ABT in 1975, the ballet has music by Antonin Dvorak, scenery by Ming Cho Lee, costumes by Patricia Zipprodt and lighting by Jennifer Tipton. The ballet was given its revival premiere by ABT in 2007, staged by Amanda McKerrow and John Gardner.

Pillar of Fire, last performed by ABT in 2004, will be given five performances beginning Friday, October 24. Set to Arnold Schoenberg’s Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Tudor’s masterpiece received its World Premiere by Ballet Theatre in 1942 performed by Nora Kaye (Hagar), Lucia Chase (Eldest Sister), Annabelle Lyon (Youngest Sister), Antony Tudor (The Friend), and Hugh Laing (The Young Man From the House Opposite). ABT’s current production was revived in 2003 with scenery and costumes by Robert Perdziola and lighting by Duane Schuler.

Twyla Tharp’s Baker’s Dozen will receive five performances at City Center beginning Wednesday evening, October 22. A work for twelve dancers in five sections, Baker’s Dozen is set to music by Willie “The Lion” Smith and features costumes by Santo Loquasto and lighting by Jennifer Tipton. Baker’s Dozen received its World Premiere by Twyla Tharp Dance on February 15, 1979 and featured Tharp in the original cast. The ballet received its ABT Company Premiere in 2007 staged by Elaine Kudo.

George Balanchine’s Ballo della Regina, staged for American Ballet Theatre by Merrill Ashley, will have five performances at New York City Center beginning Tuesday, October 28. Set to music by Giuseppe Verdi from the opera Don Carlos, with costumes by Ben Benson constructed by Dale Wibben, Ballo della Regina received its World Premiere by New York City Ballet in 1978. The ballet was given its ABT premiere at City Center in 2007. Balanchine’s Theme and Variations will have five performances at City Center beginning Tuesday evening, October 21. Set to “Theme and Variations” from Suite No. 3 for Orchestra by Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky, the ballet features costumes by Theoni V. Aldredge and lighting by David K. H. Elliott. Theme and Variations, created for Ballet Theatre, received its World Premiere at New York’s City Center on November 7, 1947, performed by Alicia Alonso and Igor Youskevitch.



American Ballet Theatre's 2008 Season at New York City Center is made possible with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency, and the National Endowment for the Arts. Saks Fifth Avenue is the Leading Sponsor of ABT's Costume Fund. American Airlines is ABT's Official Airline.

Tickets for American Ballet Theatre’s 2008 Fall season at New York City Center go on sale in July. For more information, please visit ABT’s website at www.abt.org < http://www.abt.org > .

#2 carbro

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Posted 07 April 2008 - 05:08 PM

Qualified cheers for ABT.

This would have been a great opportunity to "rescue" some of the (even) rarer Tudor ballets like Dim Lustre, Echoing of Trumpets, Undertow or the complete Romeo and Juliet. But given Tudor's low profile in ABT, I suppose we should be happy that they're commemorating his centennial at all.

Maybe they'll put one of those on a mixed bill for next spring. :P

#3 vipa

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Posted 07 April 2008 - 05:25 PM

Good for ABT. I think everyone should have the opportunity to see Lilac Garden. As always I wish the City Center season was longer.

#4 Haglund's

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Posted 07 April 2008 - 06:22 PM

Good for ABT. I think everyone should have the opportunity to see Lilac Garden. As always I wish the City Center season was longer.

Me, too. I'm not going to go anywhere near complaining about this fall program. It appears to be fairly ambitious, and it won't be an easy sell.

I think we have to take McKenzie at his word when he says, as quoted in the Washington Post last week, that he cannot afford to do more of Tudor's works than he presently has planned. After all, did anyone else notice in that press release the absence of a major corporate sponsor for the fall season? It could get a lot worse before it gets better -- I mean, how many more of the arts world's primary sponsors are going to end up before Congress for chastisement or even in jail?

#5 atm711

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 04:48 AM

The good old days are coming back---Tudor and Company B..... :P It is gratifying to see ABT going back to its most impressive roots, even for just a few days. What a blessed relief from their Met repertoire.

#6 miliosr

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 06:14 AM

I was pleasantly surprised by this announcement.

Given the reports of Kevin McKenzie crying poverty regarding the Tudor repertory, I was bracing for the worst. Imagine my surprise to find out ABT will be performing Jardin aux Lilas, Pillar of Fire and The Leaves Are Fading -- not to mention the one-offs, the pas de deux from Romeo and Juliet and the Jiri Kylian tribute to Tudor.

I was hoping against hope that the artistic staff would revive The Moor's Pavane (which was part of ABT's repertory for the length and breadth of the 70s) for Limon's centennial but, if I had to choose, I would much rather they go-all in for Tudor than to revive Limon.

#7 Haglund's

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Posted 08 April 2008 - 11:18 AM

I think we have to take McKenzie at his word when he says, as quoted in the Washington Post last week, that he cannot afford to do more of Tudor's works than he presently has planned. After all, did anyone else notice in that press release the absence of a major corporate sponsor for the fall season? It could get a lot worse before it gets better -- I mean, how many more of the arts world's primary sponsors are going to end up before Congress for chastisement or even in jail?

In today's news, John Milne, who with his wife gave $1 million toward ABT's Sleeping Beauty, has had fraud charges filed against him by the SEC.

#8 Haglund's

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 04:37 PM

The City Center schedule is up on the ABT website calendar. It includes an addition of a new work by Lauri Stallings on those nights that include Baker's Dozen. They term it a new work, so I guess we can assume it's not going to be a ballet. Her latest work for the Atlanta Ballet was to rapper Boi something or other music. Lord, please don't test me with something like that. :thumbsup:

#9 bingham

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 05:19 PM

The City Center schedule is up on the ABT website calendar. It includes an addition of a new work by Lauri Stallings on those nights that include Baker's Dozen. They term it a new work, so I guess we can assume it's not going to be a ballet. Her latest work for the Atlanta Ballet was to rapper Boi something or other music. Lord, please don't test me with something like that. :wub:

Amen. :thumbsup:

#10 sidwich

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 05:29 PM

Her latest work for the Atlanta Ballet was to rapper Boi something or other music. Lord, please don't test me with something like that.


Hip Hop artist Big Boi of "OutKast," actually. I find some of his music quite brilliant actually, although I realize that hip hop doesn't appeal to everyone's taste.

#11 dirac

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 05:44 PM

Her latest work for the Atlanta Ballet was to rapper Boi something or other music. Lord, please don't test me with something like that.


Hip Hop artist Big Boi of "OutKast," actually. I find some of his music quite brilliant actually, although I realize that hip hop doesn't appeal to everyone's taste.


I don't know from hip hop but I'm told by reliable sources that Big Boi is pretty good. sidwich is also a reliable source :thumbsup: so I think we have a consensus.

#12 cubanmiamiboy

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Posted 11 July 2008 - 07:47 PM

Good for ABT. I think everyone should have the opportunity to see Lilac Garden.

True. I have lovely memories from Mme. Alonso's staging of "Lilac.." in Cuba. Many years later, i saw it again here in Miami by Eddie's troupe...yes, beautiful indeed.

#13 DeCoster

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Posted 15 July 2008 - 07:42 AM

I know this is a bit OT, but do any ballettalkers have advice or warnings regarding seating at City Center. I've only attended a dance performance there once and it was years ago. Is standing room an option?

#14 sz

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Posted 15 July 2008 - 09:30 AM

I know this is a bit OT, but do any ballettalkers have advice or warnings regarding seating at City Center. I've only attended a dance performance there once and it was years ago. Is standing room an option?


I prefer front, or middle-front (close to the stage) center seats of the orchestra level.
The first row, center, of the first balcony is very good too, but I personally don't like watching dancers from that above location. There is no standing room.

#15 Haglund's

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Posted 21 July 2008 - 10:48 AM

Just back from the City Center Box Office. I didn’t buy anything because I need some time to recover from the sticker shock.

The brochure is a nice one with quite a lot devoted to Antony Tudor. It promises special guest appearances on October 31 for the official celebratory evening. Pictures include Tudor with Lynn Seymour and Gelsey, and a picture of Pillar of Fire with Carlos Molina just to remind us of Management’s past stupid decisions that cost the company two beloved soloists. If anybody doubts whether ABT is inclined to repeat its stupid mistakes of the past, just wait.

What’s missing: principal dancers Corella, Carreno, Dvorovenko and Beloserkovsky.

Ticket prices are $110 for orchestra or $100 if you buy three or more performances “Create your own series”. Grand tier $95/85 and mid mezz $65/55. No exchange privilege.

Also noted that there is no major corporate sponsor for the season, but a lot of little sponsors who funded specific pieces of rep.


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